We really need another fangirl tumblr

Multi-shipping fangirl. If it's a thing I'll probably squee about it.

At the moment I'm mostly shipping ClintCoulson with some generic Marvel feels in there. Sometimes some of my old fandoms still get a look in as you never really leave a fandom, you just become less active in it but it's mostly Marvel.

Recent Tweets @Signe_chan

Well, on my planet, there’s a legend about people like you. It’s called Footloose. And in it, a great hero, named Kevin Bacon, teaches an entire city full of people with sticks up their butts that dancing, well, it’s the greatest thing there is.

(via haabloodyhaa)

stevesbuck:

young avengers + tumblr

(via aesthilia)

(x)

(via eddeha)

(via tora42)

bellegold:

"Do you want talk, maybe, about the dynamic between Coulson and May, because it’s such an interesting relationship, and it’s almost hard to know, it’s like… They’re always just looking out for one another, and it’s like who’s the caregiver, but really they both are." (x)

(via selenay936)

The ever badass S.H.I.E.L.D agent Melinda May.

(via guardiangroot)

Gamora. Last surviving member of her species. Ronan destroyed her home and took her hostage. 

(via enochianrebel)

dragon-warriors:

Marvel’s cinematic universe (so far) [x]

And it’s beautiful

(via absdax)

uofmdragon:

andthenisay:

molliehooper:

  1. soulmates au
  2. childhood best friends au
  3. teacher/student au
  4. teacher/single parent au
  5. one night stand and falling pregnant au
  6. meeting at a coffee shop au
  7. fake relationship au
  8. roommates au
  9. meeting online au
  10. high school popular kid/nerd au
  11. partners in crime au
  12. writer and editor au
  13. co-stars au
  14. lab partners au
  15. meeting in the E.R/A&E au
  16. brand new neighbours au
  17. meeting at a party whilst drunk au
  18. waking up with amnesia au
  19. parents meeting when they take their kids to class au
  20. dysfunctional relationship au
  21. best friends sibling au 
  22. two miserable people meeting at a wedding au
  23. meeting on a train ride au
  24. literally bumping into each other au
  25. librarian/avid reader au
  26. sitting on the same park bench au
  27. meeting at a support group au
  28. knocking on the wrong door au
  29. going away to war au
  30. tourist/knowledgeable local au
  31. prostitute/client au
  32. doctor/companion au
  33. celebrity/fan au
  34. meeting at a masquerade ball au
  35. one of them trying to get the other one off of drugs au
  36. living in a society where their love is taboo au
  37. meeting in prison au
  38. cop/person getting a speeding ticket au
  39. long distance relationship au
  40. exes meeting again after not speaking for years au
  41. ghost/living person au
  42. star-crossed lovers au
  43. falling in love with their best friend’s partner au
  44. one of them being diagnosed with a terminal illness au
  45. pretending to hate each other au
  46. nanny/single parent au
  47. meeting at a festival au
  48. meeting again at a high school reunion au
  49. boss/intern au
  50. going through a divorce au

You know the drill.

(via nerdwegian)

dailydot:

Why do we love Deadpool so much?
Deadpool is a product of the ’90s, when the comics industry was looking for a bit of levity as a break from the dark, morally ambiguous epics of the 80s like Watchmen, Sandman, and The Dark Knight Returns. In his early days, creators Rob Liefeld and Fabian Nicieza established his character as a slightly psychotic independent mercenary, who faced off against the real heroes as often as he joined them. As his character developed and got his own series, his sarcasm, his tendency to reference pop culture memes, and his total unpredictability became hallmarks of his character.
Writer Joe Kelly later recalled that because the creative team expected the cult series to be canceled at any moment, they felt free to take risks and do whatever they wanted with the character. The result is that Deadpool is the only Marvel character who is actually aware that he’s a superhero; that is, he knows he’s a character in someone else’s comic book. 
That knowledge gives Deadpool narrative freedom that most other characters don’t have. He inhabits the same contemporary pop culture sphere the rest of us inhabit. And he routinely breaks the fourth wall to communicate directly to the viewer, in order to remind them that he is a parody, something apart from the usual hero type. 
The result is something hilarious and totally unexpected.
[Read more!]

dailydot:

Why do we love Deadpool so much?

Deadpool is a product of the ’90s, when the comics industry was looking for a bit of levity as a break from the dark, morally ambiguous epics of the 80s like WatchmenSandman, and The Dark Knight Returns. In his early days, creators Rob Liefeld and Fabian Nicieza established his character as a slightly psychotic independent mercenary, who faced off against the real heroes as often as he joined them. As his character developed and got his own series, his sarcasm, his tendency to reference pop culture memes, and his total unpredictability became hallmarks of his character.

Writer Joe Kelly later recalled that because the creative team expected the cult series to be canceled at any moment, they felt free to take risks and do whatever they wanted with the character. The result is that Deadpool is the only Marvel character who is actually aware that he’s a superhero; that is, he knows he’s a character in someone else’s comic book. 

That knowledge gives Deadpool narrative freedom that most other characters don’t have. He inhabits the same contemporary pop culture sphere the rest of us inhabit. And he routinely breaks the fourth wall to communicate directly to the viewer, in order to remind them that he is a parody, something apart from the usual hero type. 

The result is something hilarious and totally unexpected.

[Read more!]

(via shadowen)

So I’ve decided fandom will forever be confused about Natasha’s name. Not, uh, coincidentally, comics writers have been confused about it for even longer.

The tricky bit is this: Natalia and Natasha are both forms of the Russian name Наталья. The Natalia/Natasha equivalency doesn’t exist in English, leading to all kinds of tail-chasing confusion re: which is real and which is fake. Natasha is a diminutive form of Natalia the same way Bill is for William. “Natalia” is not more authentic or more Russian, it’s just a bit more formal. And “Natasha Romanoff” is not an alias the way “Nadine Roman” or “Nancy Rushman” are.

The Romanoff/Romanova issue is just a question of transliteration. The Russian surname is Рома́нов, which is written as Romanoff or Romanov depending on your history book. Traditionally, Russian ladies take feminine endings to match their grammatical gender— Ivan Belov becomes Yelena Belova, Aleksandr Belinsky becomes Aleksandra Belinskaya. But the feminine endings often get dropped in English translation, e.g. Nastia Liukin, not Nastia Liukina. It’s a matter of preference.

If that’s too confusing, don’t worry, until about 1998 the comics had no idea what they were doing either. Natasha’s name has been Natasha since her very first appearance, where she and her partner Boris Turgenev were the butt of the obvious joke. Her last name wasn’t revealed until the early 1970s. Yeah, she went through a whole solo series without getting a last name. Weird, but it took dozens of issues for Hawkeye to get a first name.

Romanoff: a name no one knows or knew. At the time, Natasha was being written as an aristocratic jet-setter, a glamorous countess. Since Romanov is the most famous Russian surname, and superhero stuff isn’t codenamed subtlety, I figure Gerry Conway just went with what he knew.

And so Natasha Romanoff was her name through the 1970s. Instead of “Miss” or the Danvers-ian “Ms.”, Natasha used “Madame”, contributing to that Old World mystique and invoking feelings of a boudoir. By 1983 someone on staff realized that Romanova might be more technically correct. (Might being operative, here, the best way of translating the feminine endings is still debated.) Anyway, her Official Handbook to the Marvel Universe page listed her as Natasha “Romanoff” Romanova.

The next big change would occur when someone, and I’m thinking it was Chris Claremont, realized she was missing a patronym. A full Russian name has three parts: the given (first) name, the patronym, and the family (last) name. For example, Grand Duchess Anastasia, the one who had that Bluth film, would be formally called Anastasia Nikolaevna Romanova, or Anastasia “Daughter of Nicholas” Romanoff. Her brother, the Tsarevich Alexei, was Alexei Nikolaevich Romanov, or Alexei “Son of Nicholas” Romanoff. Basically: everyone in Russia has a middle name, and it is their father’s.

I think it was Claremont who realized Nat’s was lacking because he is a phonetic accent wizard and an expert on Piotr Nikolaievitch Rasputin da tovarisch. Also, because the first time I could find a patronym for Natasha was in a 1992 issue of X-men that he wrote.

The weird thing about Alianovna is that it would mean her father’s name was Alia or Alian or something else not really common. Maybe that’s why Kurt Busiek, continuity repair man, pretended it was something else in his Heroes Return Iron Man run.

Ivanovna, or daughter of Ivan, is a much more common patronym and also meshes with her backstory. But it didn’t stick. Everyone and the guidebook uses Alianovna.

What did stick was Natalia. Yeah, this is the first comic I could find that uses Natalia, and you can tell by context that Busiek’s using it to emphasize formality. When talking to Tony, she calls herself Natasha, when declaring her total identity before an epic beatdown, she takes the “my name is Inigo Montoya” route.

From the late nineties forward Natalia started popping up with some frequency, usually in formal or impersonal contexts. Yelena speaks of “Natalia Romanova” as the Red Room’s greatest legend, Natasha demands that the he-was-evil-all-along Ivan Petrovich address her without the diminutive.

There are exceptions. I figure some writers check wikipedia, see her name listed as “Natalia” and decide they’ve done their homework. Daniel Way has Logan refer to Natalia, his surrogate daughter, completely bizarre for the quasi-familial relationship and for the nickname-happy Wolverine.

Brubaker had Bucky refer to her as Natalia, at first— an odd distancing from a previously intimate relationship. Since they’ve gotten back together, though, he uses Natasha, or Nat, or ‘Tasha, or in any case, he’s dropped the formality.

Fuck Yeah, Black Widow: The Name Game  (via eppypeninc)

(Added paragraph breaks to improve readability)

I didn’t realize that the name thing was confusing, but the article explains the whole thing pretty good, awesome that somebody has done it :)

(via kimmydolldoodles)

(via absdax)

phonestrumpet:

suricattus:

"um, it’s as though Twitter and Pinterest had an unholy love child that they abandoned to be raised by Livejournal."

- me, trying to explain Tumblr to non-savvy cohort

Accurate as fuck. 

(via cateringisalie)